NET ZERO BUILDINGS

A net zero carbon building is a highly energy-efficient building, with the remaining energy requirements generated from renewable energy, preferably on-site, but it can be off-site if necessary. There should be zero net carbon emissions on a yearly basis. Four of South Africa’s major metros are implementing policies that require all new buildings to be net zero carbon from 2030. Net zero carbon buildings can result in quality housing, local economic development and establishing conditions for grid-interactive buildings of the future.

Net Zero Buildings

A net zero carbon building is a highly energy-efficient building, with the remaining energy requirements generated from renewable energy, preferably on-site, but it can be off-site if necessary. There should be zero net carbon emissions on a yearly basis. Four of South Africa’s major metros are implementing policies that require all new buildings to be net zero carbon from 2030. Net zero carbon buildings can result in quality housing, local economic development and establishing conditions for grid-interactive buildings of the future.

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Roadmap to Net Zero Carbon Buildings for 2020-2030: Policy Update

This a Roadmap that presents the key activities required by the City to achieve net zero carbon buildings by 2030. The activities highlighted in the roadmap and the corresponding approaches are pragmatic, innovative, and flexible and will be adapted to the global and local context as well as to the evolving national and legal landscape, when and if required (Pegasys, 2020).

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New Building Emissions Model

The model calculates electricity consumption and electricity-related emissions from buildings in the residential and commercial sectors for different policy scenarios (business as usual, SANS and local by-laws), based on information entered in the Inputs sheet (SEA, 2019).

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City Powers to Regulate Generation and Reticulation of Electricity: Scope for Bylaws

This report explores the question whether the inclusion of the term ‘building regulations in Schedule 4, Part B of the Constitution materially affects the national government’s power to regulate buildings and building standards and, to the extent that it does affect that power, does it give a power to regulate buildings to local government, i.e. municipalities? (Pegasys, 2018).

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Cost model comparing ‘green’ and standard buildings

This Excel-based model provides cumulative discounted capital (construction and PV) and electricity costs for different building types (residential, office, retail, school) for standard buildings, energy efficient buildings and energy efficient buildings with rooftop PV. Various inputs can be adjusted to test the financial case for green buildings. (SEA, 2018)

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